1. Dubbed Chimurenga, which means “revolutionary struggle” in Zimbabwe’s Shona language, Edjabe’s creation is an award-winning, pan African literary magazine that addresses and embraces the continent’s diversity, with a focus on “the complexity of life.”

    "Discourse on Africa is geared towards simplicity," explains Edjabe. "Everything must be simple, ‘he’s a poor black man, he’s a victim,’ like there has to be a simple story, in a way this is what signifies Africa and global consciousness," he adds.

    "The moment you bring a degree of complexity to it, it kind of throws people off, they just don’t know where to look anymore, it’s like, ‘what’s going on?’ So Chimurenga in a way does not try to maintain the superficiality of this narrative — we engage with life, we try to present life as complex as it really is."

  2. The Afro-fusion quartet from Nairobi greets the morning birds and joggers on the Pfluger Pedestrian Bridge in Austin, Texas, with a version of its recent single “Love or Leave.” via NPR

    Love it! They should come perform in Minneapolis sometime. Next year’s African Summer at the Cedar, perhaps?

    -Nekessa

  3. 
How welcoming is Minnesota to newcomers? That’s the question being posed by The Advocates for Human Rights. This year and next, the Minneapolis-based nonprofit is monitoring, documenting, and assessing the experiences of immigrants and other key communities against international human rights standards. It’s part of a project called the One Voice Minnesota Network, an effort to build more welcoming communities statewide by providing tools and resources and promoting collaborations.
Next Wednesday, May 30, the public will have an opportunity to learn more about the Advocates’ work and how to utilize the Twin Cities Daily Planet and various social media tools to become better connected, more effective immigrant rights advocates. “Welcome to Minnesota: A Conversation about Immigration and Human Rights” is a free event, co-hosted by the Twin Cities Media Alliance.
This will be the first in a series of community events organized by the Twin Cities Daily Planet, with support from the Bush Foundation. Last year’s series of “New Normal” articles and community conversations definined challenges Minnesotans face in the current economic climate and identified possible solutions. This year the focus is on action steps. Between now and November, the Daily Planet will co-sponsor community meetings with approximately 20 organizations that emphasize civic engagement as a key element of their work.
Immigration will be the subject of three of those meetings. Other topics are education, work, environment, health care, and transportation.
The meetings will allow organizations like The Advocates for Human Rights to introduce themselves, describe their work, and identify ways the public can mobilize and become more involved. Twin Cities Media Alliance staff will present on how citizens can use new media to particiapte more fully in conversations and take action on the issues most important to them. Ample time will be provided for mingling and networking. 
The Advocates provide several ways for people to plug in and be involved, including: becoming a cyberlobbyist, sending postcards, organizing workshops, showing a film, starting a book club, or monitoring media. Involving volunteers in research, education, and advocacy is a key way the organization builds broad constituencies in the United States and select communities globally. 
Promoting civil society and reinforcing the rule of law through working to implement international human rights standards has been a core mission of The Advocates for Human Rights for over 25 years. In addition to immigrant rights, the Advocates focus on human rights in the United States, international justice, and women’s human rights.
- Bruce Johansen
via 
tcdailyplanet

    How welcoming is Minnesota to newcomers? That’s the question being posed by The Advocates for Human Rights. This year and next, the Minneapolis-based nonprofit is monitoring, documenting, and assessing the experiences of immigrants and other key communities against international human rights standards. It’s part of a project called the One Voice Minnesota Network, an effort to build more welcoming communities statewide by providing tools and resources and promoting collaborations.

    Next Wednesday, May 30, the public will have an opportunity to learn more about the Advocates’ work and how to utilize the Twin Cities Daily Planet and various social media tools to become better connected, more effective immigrant rights advocates. “Welcome to Minnesota: A Conversation about Immigration and Human Rights” is a free event, co-hosted by the Twin Cities Media Alliance.

    This will be the first in a series of community events organized by the Twin Cities Daily Planet, with support from the Bush Foundation. Last year’s series of “New Normal” articles and community conversations definined challenges Minnesotans face in the current economic climate and identified possible solutions. This year the focus is on action steps. Between now and November, the Daily Planet will co-sponsor community meetings with approximately 20 organizations that emphasize civic engagement as a key element of their work.

    Immigration will be the subject of three of those meetings. Other topics are education, work, environment, health care, and transportation.

    The meetings will allow organizations like The Advocates for Human Rights to introduce themselves, describe their work, and identify ways the public can mobilize and become more involved. Twin Cities Media Alliance staff will present on how citizens can use new media to particiapte more fully in conversations and take action on the issues most important to them. Ample time will be provided for mingling and networking. 

    The Advocates provide several ways for people to plug in and be involved, including: becoming a cyberlobbyist, sending postcards, organizing workshops, showing a film, starting a book club, or monitoring media. Involving volunteers in research, education, and advocacy is a key way the organization builds broad constituencies in the United States and select communities globally. 

    Promoting civil society and reinforcing the rule of law through working to implement international human rights standards has been a core mission of The Advocates for Human Rights for over 25 years. In addition to immigrant rights, the Advocates focus on human rights in the United States, international justice, and women’s human rights.

    - Bruce Johansen

    via 

    tcdailyplanet
  4. I cannot help myself…. these girls are adorable. 

    (via lajefadelasjefas)

  5. Spokesman Recorder’s Dwight Hobbes interviewed me last month for Women’s History Month. 
-Nekessa

    Spokesman Recorder’s Dwight Hobbes interviewed me last month for Women’s History Month. 

    -Nekessa

  6. A couple of boys playing chess draughts (checkers) using found objects, mostly rocks and twigs, outside the Brian Coyle Center in Minneapolis.

    -Nekessa

  7. Reflections of New Minnesotans: Celebrating this year's Nobel Peace Prize to three women

    newminnesotans:

    Its wonderful to see the Nobel Peace Prize committee acknowledge the work of women during conflict. This year’s laureates were Liberian president Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, peace activist Leymah Gbowee, and Tawakkol Karman of Yemen, a pro-democracy campaigner. It is a victory in many ways: only one…

    (Source: newminnesotans)

  8. A prayer ceremony led by traditional drum groups and dancers of the North America, and Meshikas of Mexico and Central and South America at the Hennepin Govt Center, now known as the People’s Plaza by OccupyMn protesters. 
“Indigenous peoples of North and South America [were at the People’s Plaza] to reoccupy our sacred Mother Earth. We will join together as one on this day of national mourning of the genocide of 120 million indigenous peoples of the Western Hemisphere, as American and the world celebrates the pirate Columbus.”
See more photos here. 

    A prayer ceremony led by traditional drum groups and dancers of the North America, and Meshikas of Mexico and Central and South America at the Hennepin Govt Center, now known as the People’s Plaza by OccupyMn protesters. 

    “Indigenous peoples of North and South America [were at the People’s Plaza] to reoccupy our sacred Mother Earth. We will join together as one on this day of national mourning of the genocide of 120 million indigenous peoples of the Western Hemisphere, as American and the world celebrates the pirate Columbus.”

    See more photos here

  9. Images from Minnesota’s first day of “Occupy” protests at the “People’s Plaza.”
I was in downtown Minneapolis for most of the day and took close to 500 photos! Click here to get a glimpse of some of them. 

    Images from Minnesota’s first day of “Occupy” protests at the “People’s Plaza.”

    I was in downtown Minneapolis for most of the day and took close to 500 photos! Click here to get a glimpse of some of them. 

  10. Reflections of New Minnesotans: Arab American super heroine fights for justice; with olive oil

    newminnesotans:

    Kathryn Haddad’s Zafira the Olive Oil Warrior looks at what would happen if Arab and Muslim Americans were held in internment camps just as Japanese Americans were in the ’40s. In this haunting play, school teacher Vicki, played by Taous Khazem, is emboldened by her alter-ego, Zafira. I interview…

    (Source: newminnesotans)